Sustainability

Environmental Monitoring

Satellite-based information is essential for environmental monitoring, as global climate control relies on timely and accurate satellite data. 

Norway has taken a leading role internationally in monitoring global deforestation. By providing satellite mosaics of selected regions, deforestation can be monitored and controlled with the aim of reducing it.

12 football pitches of rainforest disappear every minute due to illegal deforestation. This is a threat both to the environment and biodiversity. KONGSBERG is leading a groundbreaking international project, where we monitor all of the rainforests by satellite. The images are available for everybody for free.

“Our main goal is to stop the deforestation of the rainforest due to logging,” says Bård Vegar Solhjell, Director General in Norad.

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Bård Vegar Solhjell, Director General in Norad.

The rainforest covers vast areas, is inaccessible, and it is difficult to get a good overview of it.

“If we are going to make one, we need detailed knowledge. The satellite images from Kongsberg Satellite Services give us that,” says Solhjell.

Satellites take pictures of the earth at a high altitude. They cover a vast area on the ground in each image. If you have enough satellites, you can take a picture of the same area every day.

There are so many details in the images that you can see with a high degree of certainty, what is happening on a daily basis.

“You get an overall view of the development and management of the rainforest, and if it is in line with our goals,” says Karsten Ringjord, Director Sustainable Initiatives in Kongsberg Satellite Services.

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Karsten Ringjord, Director Sustainable Initiatives in Kongsberg Satellite Services.

Kongsberg Satellite Services: Environmental Monitoring

Free acess to pictures

The rainforests are situated in quite poor countries. Often, nongovernmental organisations, the media, and companies don't have the money, or do not prioritize spending money on it.

“We have bought that data and make them available for everybody for free. Not having access is no longer an excuse,” says Solhjell in Norad.

Kongsberg Satellite Services have worked hard to spread information about this program all over the world. Google would like to integrate the data in its Google Earth Engine. Anyone with Internet access can log on and get access to monthly images, of over 45 million km² of rainforest. You can use your mobile phone and look at the images there.

“Everybody gets access to the same information, and we succeed with a management that is transparent,” says Ringjord in KSAT.

Authorities can use this information to uncover illegal logging. Companies can explore their value chains. Journalists, NGOs and the indigenous population can examine them, act on illegal acts and make society more aware.

“If you have the facts, you have the power. When everybody can access the facts, it is possible for everybody to get involved, to make choices and do what is necessary to manage the rainforest better,” says Ringjord in KSAT.

Anyone with Internet access can log on and get access to monthly images, of over 45 million km² of rainforest. You can use your mobile phone and look at the images there.

Monitoring fishing vessels

Sustainable management is about using a resource, so that it is preserved for the generations to come.

“We know this from our own management of fisheries,” says Solhjell in Norad.

When you monitor regularly, you can trend the behaviour of vessels. You get a basis for decision making, and you can examine what is going on.

“Satellite based monitoring is of great value to society,” says Ringjord in KSAT.

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Fish is a global resource, but has to be properly managed to prevent overfishing. 

Fisheries crime and illegal fishing are global challenges, threatening sustainable development goals. The food supply is reduced. Economic development is prevented. The immense overfishing is threatening the biodiversity and ecosystem in the ocean.

KONGSBERG have solutions that contribute to monitoring the rainforests, and we can also contribute with technology to find vessels operating illegally and put a spotlight on fisheries crime that occurs every day in the oceans.

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Geir Håøy, President and CEO of KONGSBERG.

“Those who are suffering the most, are the countries without the resources to fight the problem. Norway can make a global difference, by using today's technology for a common, sustainable future,” says Geir Håøy, President and CEO of KONGSBERG.

 

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